reflecting on 2014

2014-12-31 SAPPORO, JAPAN -- The year 2014 felt long for us. 2014 started great, with a relaxing vacation at our home in Oregon, followed by a train trip from Sapporo to Kagoshima and back. In the same month of January I was stunned to learn of the loss of my close friend, mentor, and aviation buddy Bruce Lowerre, and in August, of the manga artist Obi Hiroshi whom I had met just once almost exactly a year before his death and whom I hoped to develop at least a professional relationship if not a friendship.

Noriko sympathized with my grief and suggested that I take a free trumpet lesson because she knew I always harbored a fascination for the instrument (I had drawn a trumpet for my college freshman class T-shirt and sweatshirts, and had purchased but not pursued an electronic trumpet shortly after joining Hokudai in 2003). I surprised myself for registering for trumpet lessons. I received my rental trumpet on 2014-07-01 and as of today 2014-12-31 exactly 6 months have passed.

I immensely enjoy my music adventure. My only regrets are that I have not much to show to my 2 teachers Izuru Konishi and John Bringetto. Although these 2 gentlemen may have remotely possibly seen students worse than me, those hypothetical students were probably children forced against their will to learn music by their parents. In my case, however, I signed up for lessons. I have been committed, recently practicing 2.5 hours daily, which is considerable for a person with a full-time job. Yet those precious 2.5 hours are simply insufficient. A middle school or high school band member might practice 4 hours a day. A college music major would practice 8 hours a day. At my rate of practice, I would never become even half as good as 9th grader.

I see myself as at best a beginning-level trumpeter that no band or ensemble would want. I accept that with rational dismay, because after all music is a hobby, a sideline to my arguably successful occupation as an associate professor at a major university -- this year, 2 graduate students of ours were hired by prestigious universities, our paper won an outstanding paper award, and we won a few grants. Yet as a novice student of music who happens to be an overly logical adult I foresee a limited future akin to homeowners who are justifiably proud of their real estate and yet realizing that they would never own that 7-bedroom 4-car-garage house with 2 swimming pools on 10 acres. My musical journey will allow me to appreciate the equivalent of the majesty of Chomolungma (Mt Everest) and the achievements of the people who summitted it. I myself will enjoy walks in the city park.

Today I watched an interview with Arturo Sandoval, who exhorted trumpeters to spend 3 seconds before each practice session expressing gratitude for the exquisite opportunity to enjoy music, despite life’s numerous obligations. I am delighted that I am allowed to engage in my new pursuit.

Hence I find it fitting to close this year with a sense of deep happiness and intense good fortune that our 4 parents, 2 siblings and their families are relishing their lives in excellent health.

goh's first trumpet

2014-11-11 TOKYO, JAPAN -- I’m getting my own trumpet!

Since 2014-07-01 I’ve been renting a Yamaha YTR-3335S. I’ll return it to the Yamaha store in Sapporo on 2015-01-31. Because Noriko and I often travel to Tokyo (partly for work, and partly to visit our parents) and because flying does no good for musical instruments, I ordered a trumpet so that I can practice in Tokyo.

My trumpet should arrive the evening of 2014-11-13. I can hardly wait!

There were a few minor hiccups but the trumpet arrived and I showed it to my parents. I wonder when I’ll become able to play the trumpet instead of playing with it.

Carol Brass Zorro II




halloween party

2014-10-29 SAPPORO, JAPAN -- We celebrated Halloween 2 days early in our wed[1234] classes.

Noriko was a bat. Kero was Robin Hood. I was an original youkai spirit named Siranubasu, that lives in Ohno Pond and preys on students who foolishly register for classes without reading the course offerings. That’s supposed to be a lily pad and a lotus root I’m wearing.

Students, download your group photos from Glexa!


classroom change

2014-10-07 SAPPORO, JAPAN -- From 2014-10-08 until 2015-01-14, our wed[1234] classes will meet in S10, a regular (and warmer) classroom on the 2nd floor of S building. Tell your friends!

more trumpet lessons

2014-09-20 LINCOLN CITY, OREGON -- Learning the trumpet has become a major part of my life. Trumpeters practice religiously. I aspire to do the same. Since renting my instrument on 2014-07-01, I have not missed a day of practice.

We use a spare bedroom as a music room. During the day I practice without a
practice mute. I prefer no mute because the air flows differently with the mute on. The mirror reflects the image of my embouchure (the configuration of the lips, cheek, tongue, and jaw). The mirror also reflects the sound projected from the trumpet bell. The sound bounces off the hard glass surface, giving me strikingly different acoustic feedback compared with the sound heard directly from the horn that I would hear were I playing in an open area.


On Saturday mornings we drive 35 miles for trumpet lessons at
John Bringetto’s house. We want to arrive a few minutes early so as not to make John nervous (“Are they coming?”) but not too early as to be a nuisance (“Would you like some tea?”). So we leave home way early, and park and practice for half an hour at the Brian Booth State Park (formerly known as the Ona Beach State Park) across the highway from where John lives.


This morning we brought John and Amanda cookies from Japan. Plus a lot of questions written in my notepad. John patiently answered each one.


We finally established a good embouchure! I was set back 2 months. Think that’s bad? John spent a year in high school re-learning his embouchure that he had for 2 years.
Louis Maggio (whose method was incorporated in the practice book that John uses daily) was forced to re-build his embouchure following a terrible accident that destroyed his lips and teeth. Compared to them, I am phenomenally fortunate. My mistake (at least this one) was nipped in the bud. Thanks John!


Many people strengthen their “chops” (muscles in the lips and cheeks) by holding a pencil between their lips. Another training method is to pass a piece of thread through a button, putting the button between your lips and your teeth, and pulling the button with the thread.
One manufacturer sells a specialized training tool called the “P.E.T.E”. I fabricated my own with a bolt, washer, and nut. I use it when I get bored.


After lessons, Kero insists we have a nice lunch in Newport, roughly halfway between John’s house and ours. Today we went to
Mollie’s Food Follies, near the Hatfield Marine Research Center. Big buttery veggie omelet!


Our next lesson with John will be in March. Until then, I’ll study with Izuru Konishi in Sapporo.

our trumpet teacher performs

2014-08-16 NEWPORT, OREGON -- Noriko and I listened to my trumpet teacher John Bringetto and his buddy Jim Cameron play music at the Cecil’s Dirty Apron restaurant in Newport, about 25 miles south of where we live.

John is a sailor, musician, and
teacher. We are just starting to learn of his extensive adventures. Tonight he and Jim entertained us with favorite jazz tunes.

Above: Cecil’s is off US 101. Live music is offered frequently. The box on the wall next to Noriko (seated at the far left) is a modern jukebox. Insert your credit card and apparently your song is downloaded to the jukebox in case it’s not already stored locally.

Above: Cecil’s serves Louisiana cuisine. Their gumbo is a complete meal in itself. Next time, we won’t order the hamburgers!

Above: John and Jim have been playing together for 4 years.

Above: Both John and Jim sing. John switches instruments -- trumpet, flugelhorn, saxophone, flute. While he sings, he plays bass on the keyboard with his right hand, so that the keyboard has 3 hands playing on it simultaneously.

Above: My eyes were glued to John’s lips. Embouchure (the configuration of primarily the lips and secondarily the cheek, jaw, and tongue) is paramount to playing brass instruments. I need to learn the embouchure appropriate for me.

Above: Between bites of food, I would breathe with John’s playing -- that is, while he was playing notes, I would try to slowly exhale. I couldn’t keep up! John seems to have an endless supply of air. I’m in trouble!

Above: After the 2-hour performance, Sirokuro “flying puppy” and Kero “pink frog” were introduced to the artists.

Above: It was a mesmerizing night. Thanks John and Jim! We’ll see you here at Cecil’s on 2014-08-30!

Above: We’ll be attending more performances by John Bringetto and his band. Y’all come and listen!

remembering a friend

2014-08-08 MARGATE, FLORIDA -- Noriko and I visited Edith, the sister of our late friend Bruce Lowerre, at her home in Margate, Florida.

Bruce lived 5 houses away from Edith. We visited them several times after Bruce moved there to be close to his family.

As we had in the past, we stayed in the guest bedroom at Bruce’s house. The house was empty without him. I could barely bring myself to take pictures.

Noriko and I intend to return when I can play a few songs on my trumpet for Bruce and Edith. I would like to play “Gonna fly now” (the theme from the movie “Rocky”) for Bruce, because grieving for my friend is so hard now, and because he should be flying. For Edith, I would like to play “Anchors aweigh” because she is USN, Ret.

Above: Bruce’s study. Most of his books and equipment are gone. Hanging on the wall is his CMU PhD diploma.

Above: Bruce’s belongings are slowly being given away to his surviving relatives.

Above: Edith, Pat (a neighbor), Noriko and I had lunch at the Big Bear Brewery, where we once had lunch with Bruce.

Above: Edith rescues injured or neglected pets. Sassy is one of her most recent house guests.

Above: Edith formerly played the French horn for the US Navy. She took me to a local well-stocked trumpet store, where a trumpet instructor suggested I try the Bach 3C mouthpiece. He and Edith believe that the Yamaha 1335 mouthpiece that came with my rental trumpet is too small for my mouth. They may be correct, given that most players of the rental trumpet are Japanese middle school students (who tend to be smaller than adults), and I am larger than most Japanese adults. The Bach 3C has roughly the same rim size but a shallower alpha angle (the angle between the rim and the cup). I did notice a slight improvement in producing notes. The white ornament is a toy I got at the Moomin art exhibit in Sapporo, Japan.

death of an admired artist

2014-08-03 TOKYO, JAPAN -- Obi Hiroshi (帯ひろ志), a manga artist and teacher whom I respect and admire, died this morning due to a sudden illness.

A year ago yesterday we met for the first and last time at the Sapporo Clock Tower. Obi Hiroshi chose his pseudonym from his birthplace Obihiro city on Hokkaido island. He left Hokkaido when he was a toddler, grew up and lived on Honshu island, and opened his manga studio in Sagamihara (a city in Kanagawa, close to where I spent my adolescence). The day we met, he had returned to Hokkaido island for the first time in 50 years.

Obi Hiroshi earned fame in soft-porn manga for teenage boys. I approve of his manga because his work is full of loyalty, friendship, and happy endings. There is no violence or broken promises. His heroines are healthy, optimistic, extroverted, and courageous.

Above: My favorite character Chisato from “Miracle lingerie”. Chisato gains super powers by wearing lingerie sent to earth by aliens. Her bra and panties are activated only when exposed to sunlight and to the full view of men transfixed at the 14-year-old saving the world. Obi Hiroshi softened the sexual aspect of his story by drawing Chisato as if she was wearing a bikini swimsuit, and by assigning Chisato humanitarian missions to overcome her embarrassment. Contrary to what amazon says, the books are available for purchase. (This cover artwork is identical to the books I own.)

Another reason why I respect Obi Hiroshi is his generous, sincere love of his students. He was an assistant professor at an
art school. We talked about teaching techniques and student psychology. He taught at various off-campus venues including Sapporo. I believe he was teaching a manga clinic at Tokuyama University (in Yamaguchi) when he suffered a brain stem hemorrhage that killed him within hours.

Overwork must have caught up with him. He mentioned his hectic schedule and health problems. Manga artists are rarely paid well for their artwork. Obi Hiroshi supplemented his income by illustrating corporate instructional material. He was proud of his fast turn-around times. I wish I had paid him to draw for my online courseware. If only I could have afforded to pay him enough so that he could have worked less.

It is so unfair for such a super-friendly artist and ultra-caring teacher to leave us behind.

Obi Hiroshi was 54 years old.

Above: Obi Hiroshi signed his book for me. It occupies a treasured display position in my office.

Above: Obi Hiroshi and I exchanged messages over the past few years on twitter.

Above: Obi Hiroshi’s wife announced her husband’s death on
his twitter account.

trumpet lessons

2014-08-03 SAPPORO, JAPAN -- I started taking trumpet lessons.

Above: The Yamaha YTR-3335S trumpet for beginning students. $800 to buy new, $200 to rent for 7 months.

I have no musical training whatsoever. Never learned to play an instrument, nor read sheet music, nor sing. I can’t even whistle in tune.

Listening to music has always been a pleasurable yet passive, unconcentrated activity for me. I would turn on an internet radio station, perhaps in the smooth jazz or easy listening genre, and let the music play. I wouldn’t pay much attention, and wouldn’t miss it if the music turned itself off.

During childhood I fantasized over playing the trumpet at a level of seriousness similar to becoming a superhero. Knowing this, Noriko took me to a free trumpet lesson at the Yamaha music school for adults on my 53rd birthday.

Above: The Yamaha school moved to its Sapporo-station-front location 12 month ago. We live 5 minutes away.

Above: While waiting for lessons, students study by the window overlooking the train tracks.

Above: Yamaha manufactures all sorts of musical instruments. I don’t know yet which make or model of trumpet would be best for me. I’m renting until I know what I want. It would be a wonderful Christmas or New Year’s present.

During our free trial lesson, we interviewed Izuru Konishi (a big band jazz trumpeter). We liked his life experience, personality, and teaching style, so we signed up for lessons. I say “we” but Noriko isn’t taking lessons -- she’s my adult guardian. My mental age is around 8. I would fall apart if I went to lessons alone.

We’ve had 4 lessons so far including the first (when we learned about the teacher, not the instrument). Each lesson is just the 3 of us (teacher, guardian, student), lasts 30 minutes, and meets 3 Tuesday evenings per month.

During the first 4 lessons, I’ve changed my embouchure (lip and mouth shape) 3 times already -- we’re looking for what is best for me. The one I’m practicing now seems like a winner, at least for high notes. I produce C6 fairly consistently, although I still hunt for notes. My low notes suffer though. Now I can’t produce C4 (middle C).

Today at the time of this writing my trumpet is in a suitcase traveling to America. I’ll take
lessons in Oregon, too, because Izuru recommended it, and because I want to be bilingual in music.

Above: The mouthpiece I’m using feels tiny to my big lips. Practicing the trumpet improved my whistling.

Above: Izuru signed my textbook. At that time, I didn’t know it was forbidden to place items on the piano. Sorry!

Above: The trumpet has 3 piston valves. I incorrectly imagined that the valves create 8 notes (2x2x2=8). Turns out they lower the note in 6 half-note steps (0, -0.5, -1.0, -1.5, -2.0, -2.5, and -3.0).

Above: My goal is to play “Happy birthday” on Noriko’s birthday. I have 7 months to hit G5!

Above: I bought a bunch of books. I started to read and listen a lot about music theory and trumpet playing on the internet. I also subscribed to a bi-weekly magazine for jazz appreciation. Being an academic, hitting the books is something I know how. Translating that information to mouth, breath, and fingers is an entirely different challenge.

edmedia conference

2014-06-27 TAMPERE, FINLAND -- My friend and partner Akio Ohnishi and I presented our paper at the EdMedia conference in Tampere, Finland.

We flew in to Helsinki, and then took an IC (intercity) train from Helsinki to Tampere.


Our car was double-decker brand-new model with a ravintola (restaurant) on the lower deck and passenger seats on the upper deck.


The restaurant on the lower deck has a dish washer (wow), and seating areas separated to accommodate multiple groups.


The mezzanine has its own vending corner. This area is above a dolly. On the opposite end of the car, the same area has doors that open onto the station platform.


Passenger seating on the upper deck is arranged in a 2+1 configuration, with some double seats permanently facing each other.


The single seats face the window. I’m sure Japanese would call these bocchi-seki. The locals use them to get work done. Lots of table space and elbow room.


There is a conference room at the end of the car. They say you can give presentations here. Great idea!


IC trains cover the 187 km in 120 minutes. Pendolino trains (designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro) take only 90 minutes but their cars are older.


You can reserve and choose seats online. The earlier you pay, the less you pay.


Unlike German trains which require hardcopies of tickets, Finland’s VR national train system allows you to show your electronic tickets on your laptop or mobile device.


WiFi is free, albeit slightly slow. Akio tracked our train’s progress over a beer.


Tampere is perhaps best known for the Muumilaakso (Moomin Museum). This is an art museum for serious adults. Children should probably visit Muumimaailma (Moomin World theme park) in Naantali, Finland, about 3 hours away.


There are 3 spots where you can take pictures. I was ecstatic with meeting Muumimamman (Moomin Mama). The white sticker between my eyes is the entry ticket to the museum.


The conference was held at the University of Tampere. We prefer poster sessions because they allow more interaction with our audience. I used to think lectures were more prestigious. Only if it’s a keynote! Innovative stuff shows up in posters.


Akio and I set up our poster way ahead of time.


Akio showed a looped video of our online learning experiences. We also used the campus WiFi to demonstrate Glexa using our computer servers at Hokudai. We gave out handouts. They were all gone in 2 hours!


Our next-door neighbor was a MS student who analyzed communications among health care professionals at a emergency care facility in northern Finland. I enjoyed learning about applications I didn’t know about.


Our paper was among the 12 selected from about 400 papers to receive an outstanding paper award. Thank you, our students and colleagues!




2014-06-08 MIKKABI, JAPAN -- Noriko and I attended a research planning meeting near the town of Mikkabi situated on the northwest shore of Hamanako (Lake Hamana) in west Shizuoka.

Mikkabi is famous for oranges.

Single-car trains pass over tiny tunnels connecting orange groves on either side of the track.

Trains run roughly every half hour.

I was struck by the density of tiny shrines honoring deities. Some are simple and exposed.

Some are shielded by the trees they seem to honor.

Some are housed in tiny decorated buildings.

One had a decorative bridge made for it. This is the Inohanako Jinja, a tiny but ancient shrine already in existence when it appeared on imperial court records dated 742.

Inohanako Jinja sits on a rock shaped like the snout of a wild boar (i-no-hana) at the mouth of Inohanako (lake of the snout of the wild boar), a bay with a tight opening connecting to the rest of Hamanako.

paddy junior cup

2014-06-01 EBETSU, JAPAN -- Noriko and I cheered PADDY, our ultimate team. I’m their faculty advisor. Freshmen from nearby colleges competed against each other to show what they learned during their first 2 months on their teams.

Ultimate is a sport played with flying discs. They’re not called Frisbees anymore because that’s a trademark.

There are 7 players on each side. Any number of players may be replaced whenever a score is made. You score when you catch a disc in your opponent’s end zone.

Kids spread out their gear on the grass.

Hokudai’s team is growing. This year 12 male and 12 female freshmen joined.

Ultimate is a friendly sport, and today’s event was super-friendly. Women from different teams decided to mix and play together.

While waiting for their turn to play, teammates practice throws and catches.

Sawako and Yuriko from our 2013 fall Wed3 class.

We had our picture taken with our team in the background. We wore uniforms too.

The girls brought a watermelon to be cracked and eaten at the end of the day.

We watched from a grassy embankment.

japan airlines maintenance facility tour

2014-05-21 TOKYO, JAPAN -- Noriko and I toured Japan AIrline’s aircraft maintenance facility at Tokyo Haneda airport. We signed up online for the free tour.

The tour begins with an indoor self-guided exhibit and a half-hour lecture.

Noriko the cabin attendant.

A retired pilot led our tour group through the hangar. Visitors wear strapless plastic helmets and name tags.

Big hangar doors. The automated voice “Caution: doors in operation” is noisy and distracting.

We viewed aircraft from heights and angles typically inaccessible to onlookers even at airshows.

Where I trained and flew, we never call our aircraft “ships”.

Our tour guide new the price of every part. This wing-tip vortex reducer costs $700,000.

The wing-tip vortex reducer eventually is installed on the tip of a main wing like this one.

Business class seats awaiting installation.

First class seats cost $250,000 each. Most of the cost is for EMI (electro-magnetic interference) certification.

Aircraft are stripped bare and painted with elastic paint that stretches and shrinks under large temperature changes.

keroppi day hopper

2014-05-17 SAPPORO, JAPAN -- Over 20 years ago on an iMac-DVD running OS 8, Noriko and I enjoyed “Keroppi Day Hopper”, a software application developed in the USA for children. The software manufacturer did not update the application, so it stopped running when the operating system evolved to MacOS 10. I resurrected “Keroppi Day Hopper” by installed Windows 98 on top of Parallels 9 on my latest laptop running MacOS 10.9. Noriko and I enjoy watching the pictures.


chasing trains on the esashi line

2014-05-08 ESASHI, JAPAN -- Noriko and I chased a train on the Esashi line (brief info in English).

The line was never truly busy. In recent years, it carried an average of 41 passengers per day. The line will transport its final passenger on 2014-05-12. For the last several months, they doubled the number of cars (from 1 to 2) to accommodate train buffs coming from all over the country to bid the line farewell. The extra car gives everybody a window seat.

Instead of riding the Esashi line, we drove along it, chasing 1 of the 6 trains per day from Kikonai to Esashi. The train beat us to the finish, partly because we spent some time at a tiny station in the hills.

The 2-car train doesn’t quite fit in the short, skinny platform.

She’ll be comin’ round the mountain when she comes.

This underpowered diesel-electric is a favorite among non-electrified rural track all across the country.

Miyakoshi station. Keeps the snow and chill out.

Noriko surveys the tiny, clean platform. Apart from the height from the tracks, the smallness of the platform would fool you that this was a street car stop.

The fare table (not so expensive) and the train schedule (6 coming and 6 going per day).

At the end of the line, Esashi station, with a warm stove even in May (the Sea of Japan coast is chilly) and a special desk for farewell souvenirs. They were selling out fast.

The Esashi station master signals the engineer to depart.

cherry blossoms

2014-05-08 TOKYO AND SAPPORO, JAPAN -- My departed friend calls to me ... I hear his voice all the time. The other night he appeared in a dream and he talked to me while I cried.

Bruce, here are flowers for you. I saw them near Noriko’s sister’s place in Tokyo, and on Hokudai campus.


death of a close friend

2014-02-09 SAPPORO, JAPAN -- I have been reticent because I have been in shock. I am stunned and paralyzed because my close friend Bruce Lowerre died in an airplane accident.


Bruce and I met at work. The research institute we worked for is known for inventing the computer mouse (I knew Dave Engelbart -- his wife told me how she renamed the turtle the mouse). The research team that Bruce and I belonged to later developed SIRI, the speech recognition software used in Apple products.

Bruce was a decorated researcher. His invention (the beam search algorithm) is still taught in computer science classes today.

He started his career in chemistry (his first BS was in that area), but became enthralled with computers when, as an undergraduate student, he was hired by a local bank to write computer software. CMU initially rejected Bruce’s application for graduate studies in computer science because CMU believed solid training in logic was necessary. So Bruce earned a BS in mathematics (in the 1970s, computer science was not taught at the undergraduate level), went to CMU, studied under Raj Reddy, invented the beam search algorithm, and earned his PhD.

Bruce was clever with his hands. He brought his home-made telescope to his honeymoon. He flew radio-controlled blimps at HP labs, his workplace at the time. He built toys for children of his friends.

Bruce loved what he called bar room music. He often played the piano for Noriko and me.

But his most serious love was aviation. He earned his private pilot license in 35 hours (the legal minimum allowed), and continued with his instrument rating, commercial pilot license, and flight instructor certificate. I was one of his students. Through Bruce I learned the fascination of floatplanes. I earned my private pilot, single-engine sea at Dave Wiley’s seaplane base. Bruce had almost 2000 hours of flight time. I had much less, but at one point had more floatplane time than him. Bruce and I flew floatplanes together in Florida and Washington.


As a young man, Bruce had become infatuated by the Spencer AIrCar, a wooden amphibious airplane with a boat-shaped hull and retractable wheels. Bruce resolved to build one himself. He obtained the plans for the aircraft, and bought or fabricated parts. On many occasions, I watched him working on his airplane, and sometimes handed him tools or parts. I never helped with the actual construction though, because I knew he wanted to claim he had built it all by himself.


After many years, his airplane began to take shape. Noriko and I rode in the airplane on the ground (we enjoyed a high-speed taxi up and down the runway) but we never flew in it, because federal regulations require that experimental airplanes first be flown for at least 40 flight hours with no passengers, in order to test for safety.

It was during this period of testing that Bruce was killed.

In late September 2013, two days before his fatal flight, I called him in Florida from Oregon. He told me of his intention to fly to Lake Okeechobee that weekend, partly to observe issues with the exhaust manifold. The engine had either been running hotter than it was supposed to, or the exhaust manifold was unable to handle normally expected temperatures. I wished him well, and promised to visit him as soon as he could take passengers.

I did not learn of his death until after New Year’s. A Christmas card from Bruce's sister Edith told me the terrible news. Dazed, I read various news articles, a preliminary report from the NTSB, and a closed online forum for builders of the Spencer AirCar.

I had been worried because he hadn't replied to my email nor phone calls. I kept leaving messages on his voicemail. This was not the first time Bruce was incommunicado, however. There were times when he was offline for months on end, usually due to networking problems with his internet provider. I was however concerned enough to dig up Edith's mailing address (she doesn't use email) and had planned on writing her.

I am crestfallen with the death of my friend. When Dave Wiley died in the floatplane that I had been trained in, I essentially stopped flying. With Bruce gone, I may never fly again, even to renew my license (I need to fly with an instructor and pass a knowledge and skill test every 2 years). The cockpit would remind me of the friends I lost.

Below are pictures from September 2011, the last time we visited Bruce in Florida.

At his hangar, Bruce shows me an airplane ride machine he is building for his great-nephew and great-niece. A leaf blower gives children the sensation of flying.

Bruce and I mess with the engine cowling. The propeller of the Spencer AirCar faces rearward.

Bruce takes Noriko and me on a high-speed taxi ride.

The Spencer AirCar has dual controls, but the right seat pilot almost never flies the airplane.

We did about 60 knots (about 70 mph) on the runway.
Video of the high-speed taxi. 110906_high_speed_taxi_3

Friends unconditionally embrace their friends’ passions.

Bruce signs me off for my biennial flight review. We flew a different airplane (a Cessna 150) for my review.

Bruce, Edith, Noriko and I dined richly every day. This is the Big Bear Brewery.

We lost Emily (Bruce’s wife, 2nd from left) and her mom Agnes (far left) several years ago. Now Bruce. We miss you so.

Noriko believes that Bruce and Emily are now happy. I hope so too. But at this moment I am inconsolable.

depoe bay

2014-01-02 DEPOE BAY, OREGON -- Noriko and I enjoyed an afternoon in Depoe Bay, a tiny town 20 minutes south of where we live.

The Oregon coast is rugged. Cliffs are common. Our city has sandy beaches, but for the most part, the coastline is rocky forest.

Depoe Bay has what they call a Sea Wall, where US highway 101 runs along the coast.

Tiny shops line the highway.

Decorating gardens with windmills is popular on our windy coast.

We bought a flying disc for our ultimate team Paddy.

Depoe Bay claims to have the world’s smallest navigable harbor. The boathouse on the back left is for the Coast Guard. The boat on the front left takes tourists to watch whales.

We watched from the Sea Wall.

Gulls are easy to spot.

The whales were far away. The dark shape on the left is a whale splashing water. The object on the right is a boat for tourists.

happy new year

2014-01-01 LINCOLN CITY, OREGON -- Noriko and I had toshikoshi-soba on New Year’s eve, and mochi and otoso on New Year’s day.

Soba cooking on an American kitchen stovetop (I call them ranges but most people call them stovetops).

The weather has been nice. We saw a gorgeous sunset from our dining room.